Patent Disclosure Meetings – VIDEO

This is a short tutorial for how to work with a patent attorney when preparing your patent application. This applies to startups, established companies, and individuals. The key is to provide your attorney with as much information as possible, so your application can be comprehensive and be better positioned for strength. Contact us for more information.

https://penillaip.com/patents.cfm

Brief Overview of Process

The preparation of a patent application begins with a good disclosure by the inventor(s). Usually, an inventor writes a document explaining his or her invention. The level of detail may vary, but usually it should be enough detail so that someone having ordinary skill in the particular technology can understand the details. If the inventor works for a company with an established patent program, the disclosure may be well developed. If the inventor is not assisted by a patent professional, the disclosure may require more information.

The application preparation process will generally include a meeting with the inventor(s). It is our goal is to conduct the most comprehensive and complete first disclosure meeting possible. A good first disclosure is key to an efficient preparation process that will reduce the burden on the inventor. If possible, we prefer in-person disclosure meetings, but we also routinely conduct teleconference disclosure meetings and web-based conferences.

Our firm implements specific processes for drafting a patent application to ensure the broadest protection allowable or the protection desired by the client. In drafting the specification, we also ask inventors to provide detailed examples and viable alternatives, which is recommended to ensure that adequate support is provided for each claim term. We also take pride in drafting claims that not only cover our client’s invention, but also provide adequate scope with the competition in mind. It is our goal to provide a first draft that is substantially complete, and will be ready for filing without undue revision cycles.